Use of Materials and Resources Related to the Holocaust

  • The nature of the subject of the Holocaust and the possible associated emotional impact means that teachers must take special care to preview all materials in their entirety.
  • This is particularly true of the supplemental resources found for the study of the Holocaust.
  • Age, grade level and content area suggestions need to be considered as well.
  • Each class is unique and what is appropriate for one class might not be suitable for another.
  • A designation by the publisher for the intended audience (Primary, Intermediate, Middle School, etc.) does not always accurately take into consideration the ages, reading level, or emotional maturity of the students.
  • Picture books may still contain content that is not appropriate for primary or intermediate elementary students.
  • Visual materials (videos, DVDs) need to be viewed in their entirety prior to use. This includes materials in the media center.
  • Make sure that the school-based administrator is aware of any materials that are being used prior to a reaction from parents or the community.
  • Use all procedures/processes that are in place at the school site regarding the showing of videos.
  • Many times, students have seen movies or read books with their parents or guardians. This does not mean the same materials are appropriate for classroom viewing or use.
  • Use common sense when choosing materials in print, auditory or visual formats.
  • Use the expertise of the school’s administration, District curriculum staff or educators on the Task Force.